CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

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Joe Moore
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CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:12 am

Starting off the transcriptions of another issue of CAMERA with an ad for the Hall Room Boys comedies.
It's great to be able to actually pin the credits down for at least the six films mentioned here (since the series was always changing the cast members).
Anyone know anything about the vaudeville tour referred to here that Al and Zip were preparing to go out on?

____________________________________________________

WATCH FOR

1.—“Meet Miss Mary”
2.—“Why Men Leave Home”
3.—“Tin Knights in a Hall Room”

Directed by
Al Santell

Assisted by
Roland Asher

1.—“Sacred Stiff”
2.—“Help! Help! Police”
3.---“It’s a Boy”

Directed by
Harry Edwards

Assisted by
Charles Lamont

Al Alt and George (Zip) Williams

“The Hall Room Boys”

In Preparation a Vaudeville Tour

(Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 2)

Every Day, in Every Way, It’s a Fine Day in Some Way

According to newspaper reports, several audiences cheered two old “Fatty” Arbuckle two-reelers in New York one day this week. However, a later audience “sorter’ jeered them. Oh well, that’s life—cheers and jeers.

It is announced the women of Kansas City will boycott theatres showing Arbuckle films. Such a boycott promises to leave all the seats to the boys. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 3)

_________________________________________

It sounds as if the "testing of the waters" on Arbuckle's films was still getting mixed results

Brent Walker
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Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 12:06 am

Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Brent Walker » Thu Jul 09, 2009 4:45 pm

Joe, thanks for this -- this is the first time I've seen Al Alt's name in print as having been a Hallroom Boy, though Steve Massa identified him in an HB Comedy at Slapsticon a year or two ago. I also recognized several years ago that George Williams was George "Zip Monty" Monberg, but this is the first time I've seen the nickname "Zip" used in print in connection with the Williams pseudonym. I had guessed he might have made these while under contract to someone else, hence the pseudonym, but if they're calling him Zip then he's not trying to hide too hard.

I've never heard about a vaudeville tour with Al and Zip, but it sounds like the cheers outnumbered the jeers for Arbuckle in KC.


Joe Moore wrote:Starting off the transcriptions of another issue of CAMERA with an ad for the Hall Room Boys comedies.
It's great to be able to actually pin the credits down for at least the six films mentioned here (since the series was always changing the cast members).
Anyone know anything about the vaudeville tour referred to here that Al and Zip were preparing to go out on?

____________________________________________________

WATCH FOR

1.—“Meet Miss Mary”
2.—“Why Men Leave Home”
3.—“Tin Knights in a Hall Room”

Directed by
Al Santell

Assisted by
Roland Asher

1.—“Sacred Stiff”
2.—“Help! Help! Police”
3.---“It’s a Boy”

Directed by
Harry Edwards

Assisted by
Charles Lamont

Al Alt and George (Zip) Williams

“The Hall Room Boys”

In Preparation a Vaudeville Tour

(Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 2)

Every Day, in Every Way, It’s a Fine Day in Some Way

According to newspaper reports, several audiences cheered two old “Fatty” Arbuckle two-reelers in New York one day this week. However, a later audience “sorter’ jeered them. Oh well, that’s life—cheers and jeers.

It is announced the women of Kansas City will boycott theatres showing Arbuckle films. Such a boycott promises to leave all the seats to the boys. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 3)

_________________________________________

It sounds as if the "testing of the waters" on Arbuckle's films was still getting mixed results

Joe Moore
Associate
Posts: 334
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:17 pm

Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Fri Jul 10, 2009 9:44 am

Brent,

There's a nice photo of Al and Zip in that ad which I'll try to post when I get a new scanner so everyone can get a good look at the team from early 1923.

Here's a few more bits for today's postings

_________________________________________-

Every Day, in Every Way, It’s a Fine Day in Some Way

Jackie Coogan will be obliged to pay $265,720 of that $500,000 Metro gave him to the United States government as income tax. So all is not gold that flitters (away) after all. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 3)

CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

Little Philippe de Lacey has been cast to play the leading child role in the current Douglas MacLean picture. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 9)

Jimmy Adams, famous for his excellent comedy performances in Educational comedies has been signed by Julius Stern to co-direct, play and write for Century Comedies.

Rollie Totheroth is filming “Destiny,” starring Edna Purviance and directed by Charlie Chaplin. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 13)

__________________________________

Tomorrow an interesting piece on Max Linder from CAMERA.

Joe Moore
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Posts: 334
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:17 pm

Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:00 am

CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

MAX LINDER FALLS 100 FEET IN ALPS CREVASSE AND HOVERS NEAR DEATH

While on a farewell pleasure trip in the Swiss Alps prior to departing from Europe for Hollywood, where he has arranged to resume his picture-making activities. Max Linder, France’s premier cinema star and one of the world’s foremost screen comedians, was overwhelmed by an avalanche of ice and snow which swept over a precipice into a crevasse one thousand feet below. Unconscious, he remained in this prevarious position for several hours before his dog, which had escaped the onrush, attracted mountaineers by its barking.
When, after great difficulty, Mr. Linder was rescued with the aid of ropes and he was removed to a hospital in Lausanne, the attending physicians thought at first the actor’s neck was broken but X-ray examination revealed the vertebrae as uninjured, although the muscles and tendons were dangerously twisted and caused the patient most excrutiating pain.
The first cable dispatch received in Hollywood indicated that the doctors entertained very slight hope for saving Mr. Linder’s life and stated that his neck had been broken. Consequently, his many friends were shocked immeasurably. However, a second cablegram the following day announced that although he continued in a critical condition, it had been ascertained that his neck was not broken. However, both of the star’s arms were fractured and he sustained serious internal injuries, the outcome of which is still in grave doubt.
It had been Mr. Linder’s plan to arrive in Los Angeles about January 26th in order to get his next production under way by the middle of February. Now it is uncertain as to when he will be able to travel. He has been in France for several months, having gone there with the idea of making a picture. However, inadequate studio facilities and unsettled political conditions precluded the possibility of his carrying out his plans and he had made all arrangements to return to the Southern California field when the unfortunate accident occurred. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 9)

_____________________________________

Well this certainly explains why Linder's planned return to America (mentioned in the January 6, 1923 issue of CAMERA) never happened.
The whole part about Max's dog rounding up some rescuers sounds like something out of an episode of LASSIE though.

Joe Moore

Rob Farr
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Location: Our Nation's Capitol

Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Rob Farr » Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:08 pm

Joe Moore wrote:CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

MAX LINDER FALLS 100 FEET IN ALPS CREVASSE AND HOVERS NEAR DEATH

While on a farewell pleasure trip in the Swiss Alps prior to departing from Europe for Hollywood, where he has arranged to resume his picture-making activities. Max Linder, France’s premier cinema star and one of the world’s foremost screen comedians, was overwhelmed by an avalanche of ice and snow which swept over a precipice into a crevasse one thousand feet below. Unconscious, he remained in this prevarious position for several hours before his dog, which had escaped the onrush, attracted mountaineers by its barking.
When, after great difficulty, Mr. Linder was rescued with the aid of ropes and he was removed to a hospital in Lausanne, the attending physicians thought at first the actor’s neck was broken but X-ray examination revealed the vertebrae as uninjured, although the muscles and tendons were dangerously twisted and caused the patient most excrutiating pain.
The first cable dispatch received in Hollywood indicated that the doctors entertained very slight hope for saving Mr. Linder’s life and stated that his neck had been broken. Consequently, his many friends were shocked immeasurably. However, a second cablegram the following day announced that although he continued in a critical condition, it had been ascertained that his neck was not broken. However, both of the star’s arms were fractured and he sustained serious internal injuries, the outcome of which is still in grave doubt.
It had been Mr. Linder’s plan to arrive in Los Angeles about January 26th in order to get his next production under way by the middle of February. Now it is uncertain as to when he will be able to travel. He has been in France for several months, having gone there with the idea of making a picture. However, inadequate studio facilities and unsettled political conditions precluded the possibility of his carrying out his plans and he had made all arrangements to return to the Southern California field when the unfortunate accident occurred. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 9)

_____________________________________

Well this certainly explains why Linder's planned return to America (mentioned in the January 6, 1923 issue of CAMERA) never happened.
The whole part about Max's dog rounding up some rescuers sounds like something out of an episode of LASSIE though.

Joe Moore


Or did he jump?
Rob Farr
"If it's not comedy, I fall asleep" - Harpo Marx

Joe Moore
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Sun Jul 12, 2009 11:45 am

CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

Little Philippe de Lacey has been cast to play the leading child role in the current Douglas MacLean picture. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 9)

Jimmy Adams, famous for his excellent comedy performances in Educational comedies has been signed by Julius Stern to co-direct, play and write for Century Comedies.

Rollie Totheroth is filming “Destiny,” starring Edna Purviance and directed by Charlie Chaplin. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 13)

Baby Peggy is due at the Century studio in ten days, at which time she will start on her next Century. As yet it is not known who will direct her. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 15)

Joe Moore
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Mon Jul 13, 2009 5:00 am

CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

CHAPLIN FREE OF CONTRACT GETS MORE ACTIVE

Free of entangling contracts Charlie Chaplin is now launched on the biggest and most important picture of his entire career following the delivery of his latest four-reel comedy, “The Pilgrim,” to the First National Exhibitors. Some delay was occasioned in the delivery owing to the fact that the picture was a multiple reel, one which the existing contract with First National did not cover and special financial arrangements were necessary. But agreement has been reached and the negative delivered to First National’s west coast representatives.
The delivery and the final closing of the contract which has been running five years has given added impetus to the activities of the Chaplin studio in the connection with the production of Edna Purviance’s first starring vehicle which attains utmost importance in the motion picture world owing to the fact that it was written and is being directed by Charlie Chaplin himself. However, Miss Purviance’s present serious illness has delayed him greatly in his plans.
The termination of the First National contract lines Chaplin solidly up with United Artists for all his future releases and for those of several subsidiary companies which will be launched under his direction. The contract with First National at the time it was made was considered an astounding one one in that it provided for the payment of a million dollars for eight two-reel comedies, a price that was revolutionary at the time.
The First National contract was signed and work started early in 1918 and “A Dog’s Life” was the first picture delivered. It was a sensation and is now being revived again with as much success as its original showing. Closely following this came “Shoulder Arms,” a permanent piece of cinema literature, possibly the highest comedy achievement of all time. Then cane “Sunnyside,” “A Day’s Pleasure,” The Kid,” “The Idle Class,” “Pay Day” and finally “The Pilgrim.”
According to the contract with First National all of these pictures are leased to that organization for a term of five years and at the end of that time all rights in them revert to Mr. Chaplin. The rights to “A Dog’s Life” and “Shoulder Arms” revert to Mr. Chaplin during the current year. On all of these pictures fresh negatives have been kept in the Chaplin studio vaults and when released again at the end of the five-year period the prints will be in the same condition as when issued originally. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 15)

Joe Moore
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Tue Jul 14, 2009 10:56 am

CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

BOY ACTOR, 6, IS 109-POUNDER AND HEROIC

There is one young man in the picture industry who is making greater strides in the acting line than many old-time stage actors backed by years of experience. It seems he has weight with the industry-his weight is 109 pounds at the age of 6 years! He has played in five pictures (and is cast for a sixth) since his entrance into the game in October. This young enthusiast’s name is Thomas (Fatty) Hicks; he idolizes Bill Hart and wants Mary Pickford for his sweetheart when he grows up.
Fatty’s first work was in the “Merry-Go-Round” under Rupert Julian, then he played in a Universal “Monkey Picture” under the direction of Colin Campbell, after which followed parts with Slim Summerville at Fox, and he has been going strong ever since.
Fatty is a happy little boy just now because Horace Williams, “the goodest director of all,” is going to give him a real part at the Ince studio as soon as he is ready.
But above all these accomplishments shines the fact that little six-year-old Thomas Hicks is stepping into his father’s shoes and proving himself the man of the family. His father, an engineer, was thrown from his engine while averting a train wreck, saving the lives of hundreds of passengers. His neck was broken, and now he is totally incapable of work. Now this manly little fellow is carrying on the good work of his father.
(Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 15)

Thomas Reeder
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Thomas Reeder » Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:49 pm

109 pounds at age 6? That's sad. Although I'm gratified to see on IMDb that in spite of his youthful weight he lived up to the "ripe" old age of 68.

Joe Moore
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Re: CAMERA Comedy Clippings, January 20, 1923

Postby Joe Moore » Wed Jul 15, 2009 5:50 am

Boiled Down and Served Up!

Douglas MacLean’s next starring vehicle, “Going Up”, was started this week at the Hollywood Studios. Incidentally, this is Doug’s first independent production.

Paramount stars are resting these days, Agnes Ayres, Betty Compson, Jacqueline Logan, Pola Negri, Julia Faye, Jack Holt, Walter Hiers and George Fawcett are all between pictures.

“Too Many Lovers,” Baby Peggy’s latest special Century production is finished. This picture which has Joe Moore, Edna Gregory and Billy Franey in the cast, also used all the boys Neilan used for his “Penrod”.

Actual filming of “Tea With a Kick”, Halperin Productions’ latest story based on prohibition, will start this week at the Fine Arts studios. Erle Kenton, formerly director of Mack Sennett comedies, has been engaged to handle the megaphone.

The town of Englewood, Kansas, boasting a population of 750 inhabitants, made known its decision to favor Fatty Arbuckle’s come-back by presenting a petition to that effect to the local newspaper. Every person in the village capable of writing a signature signed the petition. (Camera Vol. 5 No. 41 pg. 10)

______________________________________________________

It's interesting to see that those on Roscoe's side weren't all from the big cities and that even in "the sticks" Arbuckle had his supporters.

Joe Moore


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